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Who Is Alex Goldfarb Climber( Climber was last seen with Hungarian climber Zoltan Szlanko at Pastore Peak)Wiki, Bio, Age,Causes Of Death, Incident details,and More Facts

Alex Goldfarb Climber Bio-Alex Goldfarb Climber Wiki

Alex Goldfarb Climber was last seen with Hungarian climber Zoltan Szlanko at Pastore Peak, which is 6,209 meters above sea level. Goldfarb took advantage of a respite there to acclimatize for an attempt at nearby Broad’s Peak, which is 8,047 meters high.
Goldfarb and Hungarian Zoltan Szlanko planned to acclimatize at 6,209m Pastori Peak before launching a quick alpine-style ascent at Broad Peak, without high-altitude chargers, supplemental O2 or previously fixed ropes. Pastori had never been climbed in winter before.
Shortly after starting the climb, the heavily cracked terrain proved too dangerous for climbing instructor and mountain rescuer Szlanko, who turned around. Goldfarb chose to continue alone. In his last radio contact with BC, he stated that he planned to reach the summit and then return on Saturday night. But he did not show up in BC, and after radio and satellite phone contact proved futile, he began a search and rescue operation.

Missing

Goldfarb, who disappeared Saturday at Pastori Peak, near Broad Peak and K2.
Pakistani authorities began searching for an American climber who disappeared near K2, the world’s second highest peak, authorities said on January 18.
“Two army helicopters and a team of mountaineers are participating in the search operation,” Karar Haidri, spokesman for the government-run Alpine Club of Pakistan, told dpa.
Szlanko went down again after the break.
John Snorri, who was at K2 base camp for the winter expedition, volunteered to participate in the search operation alongside a local mountaineer. The search has produced no leads so far, he said.
“We are trying to get GPS [global positioning system] coordinates to track Goldfarb,” he told dpa Asghar Ali Porik, from the tour operator that organized the climb. He said that a satellite phone company had refused to share its location with third parties.
Porik said Goldfarb had the equipment and food to survive the extreme weather conditions. Renowned Spanish climber Sergio Mingote died while climbing K2 on January 16, the day Nepalese climbers made history with a successful winter attempt at the K2 summit.
Hundreds of mountaineers, most of them Europeans, attempt to climb peaks in Pakistan every summer, but only a few attempt it during winter. Avalanches and bad weather have been fatal in the past.

Cause of death

Goldfarb, who disappeared Saturday at Pastori Peak, near Broad Peak and K2. Helicopter searchers found his body where he allegedly fell off the mountain, expedition spokesman Laszlo Pinter reported.
Shortly after starting the climb, the heavily cracked terrain proved too dangerous for climbing instructor and mountain rescuer Szlanko, who turned around. Goldfarb chose to continue alone. In his last radio contact with BC, he stated that he planned to reach the summit and then return on Saturday night. But he did not show up in BC, and after radio and satellite phone contact proved futile, he began a search and rescue operation.
The helicopters left Skardu today and picked up John Snorri and Sajid Sadpara, who had quickly volunteered to help, from K2 base camp. Strong winds aborted an initial flight, but on a later pass, after the winds died down, pilots saw rags from a tent. On a third and final flight, they saw Goldfarb’s body. Since his body was visible, he probably fell off the mountain rather than into a crevasse, as feared.
In these times when every action first appears on social media, Snorri quietly volunteered for the rescue and, according to journalists close to Szlanko, Snorri has now made room for the surviving climber, Zoltan Szlanko, in his own tent at K2 base camp.
Goldfarb’s son’s tribute to his father:
â € œAlex is a man who never gives up. He moved to the United States just after the fall of the Soviet regime and began working illegally in a plastic factory and selling his plasma for cash. In just over a decade, he earned two doctorates and became a professor of medicine at Havard.
He continued to have an impressive academic career, publishing more than 70 peer-reviewed publications and several books. The most recent was the first Intensive Care Medicine book to include a chapter on COVID.
His boundless energy drew everyone close to him, and our home was the place to be on Friday night as guests, both invited and spontaneous, huddled around the Shabbat table and enjoyed hot food and wine. Alex was always the star of the show: when he didn’t share the latest jokes, he would treat us to stories of epic ascents, such as spending the night in a hastily made igloo on his descent from Lenin Peak (7,134 m